FRACTIONAL FLOW

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Norwegian Crude Oil Reserves And Extraction per 2016

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In this post I present actual Norwegian crude oil extraction and status on the development in discoveries and reserves and what this has now resulted in for expectations for future Norwegian crude oil extraction.

This post is also an update of an earlier post about Norwegian crude oil reserves and production per 2015.

Norwegian crude oil extraction peaked in 2001 at 3.12 Million barrels per day (Mb/d) and in 2016 it was 1.62 Mb/d, growing from 1.57 Mb/d in 2015 and 1,46 Mb/d in 2013 (a growth of 10% since 2013).

The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate’s (NPD) recent forecast expects crude oil extracted from the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) to become 1.60 Mb/d in 2017.

Figure 01: The chart shows the historical extraction (production) of crude oil (by discovery/field) for the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) with data from the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) for the years 1970 – 2016. The chart also includes my forecast for crude oil extraction from discoveries/fields towards 2030 based on reviews on individual fields, NPD’s estimates of remaining recoverable reserves, the development/forecast for the R/P ratio as of end 2016.
Further, the chart shows a forecast for total crude oil extraction from sanctioned discoveries/fields (green area, refer also figure 02) and expected contribution from Johan Sverdrup phase I (blue area) [at end 2016 estimated at 1.78 Gb; [Gb, Giga (Billion) barrels, refer also figure 07] and this development phase is now scheduled to start flowing in late 2019.

Sanctioned Developments in Figure 01 represents the total contributions from 7 sanctioned developments of discoveries now scheduled to start to flow between 2017 and 2019.

My forecast for 2017 is 1.51 Mb/d with crude oil from the NCS.

My forecast shown in figure 01 includes all producing and sanctioned developments, but not contingent resources in the fields (business areas). The forecast is subject to revisions as the reserve base becomes revised (as discoveries pass the commercial hurdles) the tail is likely to fatten as from 2022/2023 mainly due to Johan Sverdrup phase II and Johan Castberg (Barents Sea).

My forecast includes about 7% reserve growth (300 Mb) for discoveries in the extraction phase, but does not include the effects from fields/discoveries being plugged and abandoned as these reach the end of their economic life.

Discoveries sanctioned for development and Johan Sverdrup (with an expected start up late 2019) is expected to generally slow down the decline in Norwegian crude oil extraction.

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Norwegian Crude Oil Reserves And Extraction per 2015

In this post I present actual Norwegian crude oil extraction and status on the development in discoveries and reserves and what this has now resulted in for expectations for future Norwegian crude oil extraction.

This post is also an update of an earlier post about Norwegian crude oil reserves and production per 2014.

Norwegian crude oil extraction peaked in 2001 at 3.12 Million barrels per day (Mb/d) and in 2015 it was 1.57 Mb/d, growing from 1.51 Mb/d in 2014.

The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate’s (NPD) recent forecast expects crude oil extraction from the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) will decline to 1.53 Mb/d in 2016.

Figure 01: The chart shows the historical extraction (production) of crude oil (by discovery/field) for the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) with data from the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) for the years 1970 - 2015. The chart also includes my forecast for crude oil extraction from discoveries/fields towards 2030 based on reviews on individual fields, NPD’s estimates of remaining recoverable reserves, the development/forecast for the R/P ratio as of end 2015. Further, the chart shows a forecast for total crude oil extraction from sanctioned discoveries/fields (green area, refer also figure 02) and expected contribution from Johan Sverdrup (blue area) [at end 2015 estimated at 1.76 Gb; [Gb, Giga (Billion) barrels, refer also figure 06] and this development phase is now scheduled to start flowing in late 2019.

Figure 01: The chart shows the historical extraction (production) of crude oil (by discovery/field) for the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) with data from the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) for the years 1970 – 2015. The chart also includes my forecast for crude oil extraction from discoveries/fields towards 2030 based on reviews on individual fields, NPD’s estimates of remaining recoverable reserves, the development/forecast for the R/P ratio as of end 2015.
Further, the chart shows a forecast for total crude oil extraction from sanctioned discoveries/fields (green area, refer also figure 02) and expected contribution from Johan Sverdrup (blue area) [at end 2015 estimated at 1.76 Gb; [Gb, Giga (Billion) barrels, refer also figure 06] and this development phase is now scheduled to start flowing in late 2019.

Sanctioned Developments in Figure 01 represents the total contributions from 7 sanctioned developments of discoveries now scheduled to start to flow between 2016 and 2019.

My forecast for 2016 is 1.50 Mb/d with crude oil from the NCS.

My forecast shown in figure 01 includes all sanctioned developments and not discoveries (refer also figure 08) and contingent resources in the fields. The forecast is subject to revisions as the reserve base becomes revised (as discoveries pass the commercial hurdles) which likely will fatten the tail of the presented forecast post 2020.

My forecast assumes some reserve growth, but does not include the effects from fields/discoveries being plugged and abandoned as these reach the end of their economic life.

Discoveries sanctioned for development and Johan Sverdrup (with an expected start up late 2019) is expected to slow down the decline in Norwegian crude oil extraction.

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Status of Norwegian Natural Gas at end of 2014 and Forecasts towards 2025

In this post I present actual Norwegian natural gas production, status on reserves, the development in discoveries and what this results for Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) and my expectations for the future delivery potential for Norwegian natural gas.

Norway, after Russia, has been and is the EU’s second biggest supplier of natural gas.

Included is also a brief look at developments in actual consumption and production of natural gas in the EU 28 (the 28 members of the European Union).

  • NPD revised down their band for future delivery potential by about 10 Gcm/a (Bcm/a) and moved the start of decline one year forward relative to their forecast last year.
  • I now expect the Norwegian delivery potential for natural gas relative to 2014/2015 to decline by more than 40% by 2025.
  • Europe will increasingly have to rely on natural gas imports from more distant sources and should by now have implemented policies for the role natural gas will have in its future energy mix.

This post is an update to my post in 2014 looking at the status as of end 2013.

Figure 1: The chart above shows development in natural gas exports from production installations on the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) as reported by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) from 1996 to 2014 and with my forecast for delivery potential towards 2025. The chart also shows the NPD forecasts; green line upper projection, orange line lower projection. NPD’s central projection is in about the middle of the green and orange lines. The black dotted line is the forecast from the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 2012 (IEA WEO 2012). Numbers are believed to be gross exports from the production installations and thus not adjusted for “shrinkage” from Natural Gas Liquids (NGL) extraction, primarily at Kollsnes and Kårstø. The NGL extraction reduces total sales gas volumes with around 4% relative to what is exported from the producing installations. Numbers in Gcm, Giga cubic meters (Gcm = Bcm; Billion cubic meters)

Figure 1: The chart above shows development in natural gas exports from production installations on the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) as reported by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) from 1996 to 2014 and with my forecast for delivery potential towards 2025.
The chart also shows the NPD forecasts; green line upper projection, orange line lower projection. NPD’s central projection is in about the middle of the green and orange lines.
The black dotted line is the forecast from the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 2012 (IEA WEO 2012).
Numbers are believed to be gross exports from the production installations and thus not adjusted for “shrinkage” from Natural Gas Liquids (NGL) extraction, primarily at Kollsnes and Kårstø. The NGL extraction reduces total sales gas volumes with around 4% relative to what is exported from the producing installations.
Numbers in Gcm, Giga cubic meters (Gcm = Bcm; Billion cubic meters)

My forecast  and NPD’s forecast at end 2014 are basically identical towards the end of this decade, but differs about the timing for the start of the decline and how steep this will become as from early next decade. My forecast is also tested versus the Reserves over Production (R/P) ratio as of end 2014, refer also figure 2.

At end 2014 the NPD projection of Norwegian natural gas supply potential towards 2025 was revised down.

NPD’s central projection is in about the middle of the green and orange lines. Note the span of uncertainties in the NPD’s forecast.

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Norwegian Crude Oil Reserves And Extraction per 2014

In this post I present actual Norwegian crude oil extraction and status on the development in discoveries and reserves and what this has now resulted in for expectations for future Norwegian crude oil extraction.

This post is also an update of an earlier post about Norwegian crude oil reserves and production per 2013.

Norwegian crude oil extraction peaked in 2001 at 3.12 Million barrels per day (Mb/d) and in 2014 it was 1.52 Mb/d.

The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate’s (NPD) recent forecast expects crude oil extraction from  the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) will become around 1.49 Mb/d in 2015.

Figure 01: The chart shows the historical extraction (production) of crude oil (by discovery/field) for the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) with data from the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) for the years 1970 - 2014. The chart also includes a forecast for crude oil extraction from discoveries/fields towards 2040 based on reviews on individual fields, NPD’s estimates of remaining recoverable reserves, the development/forecast for the R/P ratio etc. as of end 2014. Further, the chart shows a forecast for total crude oil extraction from sanctioned discoveries/fields (green area, refer also figure 02) and expected contribution from Johan Sverdrup (blue area) [at end 2014 estimated at 2.22 Gb; [Gb, Giga  (Billion) barrels, refer also figure 05]  which is now scheduled to start flowing in late 2019.

Figure 01: The chart shows the historical extraction (production) of crude oil (by discovery/field) for the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) with data from the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) for the years 1970 – 2014. The chart also includes a forecast for crude oil extraction from discoveries/fields towards 2040 based on reviews on individual fields, NPD’s estimates of remaining recoverable reserves, the development/forecast for the R/P ratio etc. as of end 2014.
Further, the chart shows a forecast for total crude oil extraction from sanctioned discoveries/fields (green area, refer also figure 02) and expected contribution from Johan Sverdrup (blue area) [at end 2014 estimated at 2.22 Gb; [Gb, Giga (Billion) barrels, refer also figure 05] which is now scheduled to start flowing in late 2019.

“Sanctioned Developments” in Figure 01 represents the total contributions from 8 sanctioned developments of discoveries now scheduled to start to flow between 2015 and 2017.

My forecast for 2015 is 1.47 Mb/d with crude oil from the NCS.

My forecast shown in figure 01 includes all sanctioned developments and not discoveries (refer also figure 07) and contingent resources in the fields. The forecast is subject to revisions as the reserve base becomes revised (as discoveries pass the commercial hurdles) which likely will fatten the tail post 2020 of the presented forecast.

My forecast assumes some reserve growth, but does not include the effects from fields/discoveries being plugged and abandoned as these reach the end of their economic life.

Discoveries sanctioned for development and Johan Sverdrup (with an expected start up late 2019) is expected to slow down the decline in Norwegian crude oil extraction.

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Norwegian Crude Oil Extraction, Fall 2014 Status

This post is a status update on crude oil extracted from the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) and presents the developments of some selected discoveries long in the tooth and some more recent developments.

I presented my 2014 crude oil forecast towards 2040 in Norwegian Crude Oil Reserves and Production per 2013 in April 2014.

Norwegian crude oil extraction, now shows a small uptick. Looking further into the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate’s (NPD) data it turns out this temporary growth in extraction originates from discoveries that started to flow prior to 2002, refer also figures 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8.

Some of the discoveries brought to flow since 2002 have performed below expectations since these were sanctioned, some of which were described in A closer Look at some recent Developments Offshore Norway.

Figure 01: The columns show NCS crude oil extraction by month for 2012 (grey), 2013 (red)  and for 2014 (blue) as of August (preliminary NPD figures).

Figure 01: The columns show NCS crude oil extraction by month for 2012 (grey), 2013 (red) and for 2014 (blue) as of August (preliminary NPD figures).

As of August 2014 NCS crude oil extraction is around 20 kb/d (1%) above all of 2013.

(kb; kilo barrels, 1,000 barrels)

A closer look into the NPD estimates of reserves (EUR) and monthly actual extraction numbers shows that some of the recent developments have or had a high depletion rate, which raises expectations for a near future steep decline in their crude oil extraction rate.

There has been a small and expected temporary growth in crude oil extraction so far in 2014 relative to all of 2013. Two sources were found to contribute to this:

  • Higher depletion (extraction) rates from some of the recent developments than what could be expected from NPD’s estimates on ultimate recovery (EUR) as of end 2013.
  • Some of the developments long in the tooth has temporary reversed their decline and demonstrated some growth, which is believed to be due to the deployment of various drainage/technological strategies made possible by the high oil price.

Some typical characteristics for discoveries in the extraction phase;

  • As the reservoirs becomes 50 – 60% depleted, the extraction rate (flow) starts to decline.
  • A high depletion rate (higher extraction [production]) depletes the reservoir faster, which normally results in steeper declines.

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NORWEGIAN CRUDE OIL RESERVES AND PRODUCTION PER 2013

In this post I present actual Norwegian crude oil production and status on the development in discoveries and reserves and what this has now resulted in for expectations for future Norwegian crude oil production.

This post is also an update of an earlier post about Norwegian crude oil reserves and production per 2012 (in Norwegian).

Norwegian crude oil production peaked in 2001 at 3.12 Million barrels per day (Mb/d) and by 2013 it had declined by more than 50% to 1.46 Mb/d. This has been overshadowed by the fact that the price has increased 4 fold from the level from 2001, which thus and in financial terms more than compensated for the fall in physical extraction.

The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate’s (NPD) recent forecast expects crude oil production from  the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) will become around 1.47 Mb/d in 2014.

Figure 1: The chart shows the historical production (or more precisely extraction) of crude oil (by discovery/field) for the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) with data from the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) for the years 1970 - 2013. The chart also includes a forecast for crude oil production from discoveries/fields towards 2040 based on reviews on individual fields, NPD’s estimates of remaining recoverable reserves, the development/forecast for the R/P ratio etc. as of end 2013. Further, the chart shows a forecast for total crude oil production from sanctioned discoveries/fields (green area, refer also Figure 2) and expected contribution from Johan Sverdrup (blue area) [at end 2013 estimated at 2.23 Gb; [Gb, Giga  barrels, refer also figure 3]  which is now scheduled to start flowing late 2019. "Sanctioned Developments" in Figure 1 represents the total contributions from 13 sanctioned developments of discoveries now scheduled to start to flow between 2014 and 2017.

Figure 1: The chart shows the historical production (or more precisely extraction) of crude oil (by discovery/field) for the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) with data from the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) for the years 1970 – 2013. The chart also includes a forecast for crude oil production from discoveries/fields towards 2040 based on reviews on individual fields, NPD’s estimates of remaining recoverable reserves, the development/forecast for the R/P ratio etc. as of end 2013.
Further, the chart shows a forecast for total crude oil production from sanctioned discoveries/fields (green area, refer also Figure 2) and expected contribution from Johan Sverdrup (blue area) [at end 2013 estimated at 2.23 Gb; [Gb, Giga barrels, refer also figure 3] which is now scheduled to start flowing late 2019.
“Sanctioned Developments” in Figure 1 represents the total contributions from 13 sanctioned developments of discoveries now scheduled to start to flow between 2014 and 2017.

My forecast for 2014 is for 1.44 Mb/d crude oil from the NCS.

My forecast assumes some reserve growth, but does not include the effects from fields/discoveries being plugged and abandoned as these reach the end of their economic life.

Discoveries sanctioned for development and Johan Sverdrup (with an expected start up late 2019) is expected to slow down the overall decline in Norwegian crude oil production.

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NORSKE RÅOLJERESERVER OG UTVINNING PER 2012

I dette innlegget vil jeg presentere historisk norsk oljeutvinning og utvikling i funn og reserver og hva dette nå gir av forventninger til fremtidig norsk oljeutvinning.

Innlegget er en oppdatering av; Norske råoljereserver og utvinning per 2011.

Figur 1 nedenfor illustrerer at fallet i den norske råoljeutvinningen fortsetter å trosse de siste årenes sterke prisoppgang på råolje. Den voksende råoljeprisen har bidratt til å dempe fallet i råoljeutvinningen og stimulert til økt utbyggings og letevirksomhet.

Siden råoljeutvinningen toppet i 2001 med 3,12 Mb/d (millioner fat for dagen) hadde den i 2012 falt til under 50 % (1,53 Mb/d) av toppnivået. Dette har blitt overskygget av at prisen har økt rundt 4 ganger nivået fra 2001 og dermed mer enn kompensert for fallet i fysisk utvinning.

Oljedirektoratet sin ferskeste prognose venter at råoljeutvinningen vil falle til 1,47 Mb/d (millioner fat for dagen) i 2013 fra 1,53 Mb/d i 2012.

Figur 1 illustrerer at de største funnene gjøres først, kommer raskt i utvinning og med tiden (og avhengig av oljeprisen) blir de mindre funnene utviklet.

Figur 1: Figuren viser historisk utvinning av råolje (etter felt) for norsk sokkel med data fra Oljedirektoratet (OD) for perioden 1970 - 2012. Figuren viser også en fremskrivning av råoljeutvinningen fra felt mot 2040 basert på vurderinger av fallrater, ODs estimater på gjenværende utvinnbare reserver, utvikling i R/P forhold etc..Videre er det inkludert en prognose på den samlede råoljeutvinningen fra felt som er besluttet utviklet (grønt areal, ref også figur 2) og bidraget fra Johan Sverdrup (blått areal) som nå planlegges satt i utvinning sent i 2018.

Figur 1: Figuren viser historisk utvinning av råolje (etter felt) for norsk sokkel med data fra Oljedirektoratet (OD) for perioden 1970 – 2012. Figuren viser også en fremskrivning av råoljeutvinningen fra felt mot 2040 basert på vurderinger av fallrater, ODs estimater på gjenværende utvinnbare reserver, utvikling i R/P forhold etc..
Videre er det inkludert en prognose på den samlede råoljeutvinningen fra felt som er besluttet utviklet (grønt areal, ref også figur 2) og bidraget fra Johan Sverdrup (blått areal) som nå planlegges satt i utvinning sent i 2018.

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