FRACTIONAL FLOW

Fractional flow, the flow that shapes our future.

Archive for the ‘Saudi Arabia’ Category

World Crude Oil Supplies per July 2017

In this post I present developments in world crude oil (including condensates) supplies since January 2007 and per July 2017.

  • In this post the world crude oil (inclusive condensates) supplies is split into three entities, North America [Canada, Mexico and the US], OPEC(13) and other Non OPEC [World – {North America + OPEC(13)}] with a closer look at Brazil.
  • For OPEC(13) a closer look at developments of number of active oil rigs versus developments in the oil supplies. This is supplemented with developments in the oil supplies versus the number of active oil rigs for some selected OPEC countries.
  • Looking at figure 07 for OPEC(13) the increase in its supplies as of late 2014/early 2015 followed a period with noticeable growth in oil rigs and likely capacity expansions/modifications of oil process/treatment facilities.
    The accompanying increase in OPEC(13) supplies may simply have been rationalized from a pure business desire to recover the investments (CAPEX) from these capacity expansions.
  • Finally a closer look at developments in petroleum consumption/demand and stock changes for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).
    The OECD has about half of total global petroleum consumption and a major portion of the global petroleum stocks.
  • “It took a lot of costly oil to bring down the oil price. This is the magic from lots of cheap credit.”

Data from this post is primarily from EIA Monthly Energy Review October 2017.

Figure 01: Figure 1: The stacked areas in the chart above shows changes to crude oil supplies split with North America [North America = Canada + Mexico + US], OPEC and other non OPEC [Other non OPEC = World – (OPEC + North America)] with January 2007 as a baseline and per July 2017. Developments in the oil price (Brent spot, black line) are shown against the left axis.

It was the oil companies’ rapid growth in CAPEX leveraged by cheap debt [ref US Light Tight Oil (LTO)] and expectations of a sustained higher oil price that brought about a situation where supplies started to run ahead of consumption/demand that brought the oil price down. During the run up to the oil price collapse, supplies also grew from other non OPEC (ex North America) from developments sanctioned while the oil price was high and expected to remain so.

Following the oil price collapse several of these developments had to take considerable write downs.

This coincided with increased OPEC supplies in what became widely explained as a bid from OPEC for market share.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Contango Spread Supports The Oil Price And Results In Strong Stock Building

As analysts and pundits keep staring into their crystal balls searching for clues to future moves in the oil price, it may be more helpful to look at some actual developments that may explain the recent strong US stock builds, developments in US total petroleum consumption and what this now may presage about future oil price movements.

In this post I present a closer look at the recent growth in US total petroleum demands split into:

  • Development in US total petroleum consumption (inclusive some selected products)
  • Rate of stock build of US commercial crude oil stocks

Then a look at developments in crude oil supplies from OPEC where several of the big oil producers in the Middle East have had strong growth in the number of oil rigs since early 2014. Recent media reports about increases in oil supplies from the biggest Middle East oil producer.

Figure 01: The chart above shows developments in the oil price (Brent spot), blue line and left hand scale [The oil price has been multiplied by 4 to fit the scaling on the left hand scale]. The thick black line shows the weekly EIA reported total inventory of US commercial crude oil stocks, left hand scale. The thin gray line plotted versus the right hand scale shows the daily changes to crude oil inventories from weekly EIA data. The thick red line plotted versus the right hand scale is a trailing 28 days moving average of changes to the crude oil inventories. Stock draw downs adds to supplies and may moderate price growth for some time. Figure 02 has zoomed in on the recent developments.

Figure 01: The chart above shows developments in the oil price (Brent spot), blue line and left hand scale [The oil price has been multiplied by 4 to fit the scaling on the left hand scale]. The thick black line shows the weekly EIA reported total inventory of US commercial crude oil stocks, left hand scale.
The thin gray line plotted versus the right hand scale shows the daily changes to crude oil inventories from weekly EIA data.
The thick red line plotted versus the right hand scale is a trailing 28 days moving average of changes to the crude oil inventories.
Stock draw downs adds to supplies and may moderate price growth for some time.
Figure 02 has zoomed in on the recent developments.

In Q1 2014 the average daily US stock build was 0.29 Mb/d and during Q1 2015 the average US daily stock build was 1.10 Mb/d.

Demand for US stock build was up 0.8 Mb/d year over year. This stronger stock build temporarily adds to (global) demand and supports the oil price.

What drives this strong stock build is the price spread between contracts for prompt/front month deliveries versus contracts for later deliveries when the futures curve is in what is referred to as contango, refer also figure 3.

The recent strong builds in US crude oil storage may give away some clues about underlying developments in consumption.

Demand = Consumption + Stock changes = Supplies

Read the rest of this entry »

The Crude Oil Price and Changes to Total Global Private Credit/Debt

This is another installment of my work in progress about credit, interest rates and the oil price. Though many of the mechanisms for some time (as in several years and in some circles) have been well understood, nothing beats having the cover of data/reports from authoritative sources.

In this post I present the observations and results from the research of the developments in some selected OECD countries and emerging economies (non OECD) in their petroleum consumption together with the relative developments in their total non financial debt since 1999.

This may put into context how emerging economies were able to grow their petroleum consumption as the oil price grew and remained high. Likewise provide some insights into some of the mechanisms at work that caused a decline in petroleum consumption for the selected OECD countries.

The selected countries presented and the world had the following changes in their total petroleum consumption between 2005 and 2013 based upon data from BP Statistical Review 2014:

OECD countries:  – 4.04 Mb/d (decline)

Emerging economies: 8.39 Mb/d (growth)

Growth in world petroleum consumption: 6.94 Mb/d

The numbers illustrate that the emerging economies’ total growth in petroleum consumption was greater than the world’s from 2005 to 2013. These emerging economies effectively bid out OECD for a portion of its consumption to meet its own growing demand.

·         How was this accomplished?

·         Were the emerging economies about to decouple from the advanced economies?

·         What caused petroleum consumption for the OECD countries to decline?

I set out to explore what could be the likely causes by looking into the relative changes in total non financial debt of these countries armed with data from the Bank for International Settlements (BIS, in Basel, Switzerland) placed together with the changes in their petroleum consumption as from the end of 1999 with data from BP Statistical Review 2014.

It turns out that changes in petroleum consumption for these countries closely follow relative changes to total private non financial debts. Then add changes in sovereign/public debt.

Demand is not what one wants, but what one can pay for.

And expectations for demand drives investments for supplies.

Credit is a vehicle which allows for demand to be pulled forward in time and to some extent negates any price growth and allows for investments to meet expected demand changes.

Credit works both sides of the demand and supply equation.

Read the rest of this entry »

VERDENS OLJEFORSYNING, EN OPPDATERING DESEMBER 2012

Dette innlegget er en oppdatering på utviklingen i verdens forsyning av energi i væskeform per august 2012 slik dette er rapportert av EIA. I presentasjonen er verden delt inn i fire økonomiske grupper; OECD, Russland, OPEC og resten av verden (ROW; Rest Of World).

Fortsatt mener jeg den globale forsyningen av råolje har potensial for å vokse med 1,0 – 1,5 Mb/d (Mb/d; Millioner fat per dag) gjennom 2013 drevet av responsen til en strukturelt høyere oljepris. Forsyningen er drevet av vekst i utvinningen av olje fra skifer (Bakken og Eagle Ford i USA) bitumen i Canada, tilbakevending av produksjon i Libya og potensial for vekst fra Irak. Fra 2013 vil Manifa i Saudi Arabia ha potensial til å levere 0,9 Mb/d. Inkludert i forsyningsveksten vil være en normalisering av produksjonen fra Sudan der utvinningen siste året har blitt redusert med 0,4 Mb/d.

Dette skjer mens forbruket i OECD faller med bakgrunn i svakere økonomisk aktivitet og det kommer motstridende oppfatninger om størrelsen på den videre økonomiske veksten for India og Kina.

VERDENS OLJEFORSYNING

FIG01WORLDLIQUIDSSUPPLYAUG2012

Figur 01; Diagrammet ovenfor viser utviklingen i verdens forsyning av råolje og kondensat (grønne kolonner), NGPL (Natural Gas Plant Liquids; etan, propan, butan (lys blå kolonner)), annen energi i væskeform (etanol, biodiesel etc. (røde kolonner)) og volumøkninger fra raffinering (refinery gains; gule kolonner) har utviklet seg fra januar 2001 til august 2012. I diagrammet er også tegnet inn utviklingen i oljeprisen, Brent.

Dataene fra EIA viser nå en vekst i forsyningen av råolje og kondensat og denne veksten er drevet av vekst i utvinningen av olje fra skifer, bitumen og etter hvert fra funn som krever en høy pris for å gi lønnsomhet.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Rune Likvern

Tuesday, 4 December, 2012 at 20:05

NOEN FÅ INNTRYKK FRA BP STATISTICAL REVIEW 2012

Dette innlegget er i hovedsak noen diagram basert på BP Statistical Review 2012. Forhåpentligvis er diagrammene selvforklarende og videre at de enkelt formidler hvor fremtidig vekst i den globale oljeforsyningen mest sannsynlig vil komme fra.

VERDENS OLJERESERVER

Figur01: Diagrammet viser utviklingen i verdens oljereserver etter kategoriene konvensjonell olje som inkluderer råolje, kondensat og NGL, oljesand (hovedsakelig bitumen) og tung olje fra Orinoco i Venezuela. Utviklingen i oljeprisen er også inkludert.

Videre i dette innlegget er verden delt inn i 4 økonomiske soner, OECD, FSU (Former Soviet Union; tidligere Sovjetunionen), OPEC og ROW (Rest Of World; resten av verden).

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Rune Likvern

Monday, 25 June, 2012 at 16:20

Posted in OECD, OPEC, Saudi Arabia, USA

Tagged with , , , , , ,

VERDENS OLJEFORSYNING, EN OPPDATERING MAI 2012

Dette innlegget er en oppdatering på utviklingen i verdens forsyning av energi i væskeform per februar 2012 slik dette er rapportert av EIA. I presentasjonen er verden delt inn i fire økonomiske grupper; OECD, Russland, OPEC og resten av verden (ROW; Rest Of World).

I et senere innlegg vil jeg presentere en oppdatering på hvordan etterspørselen/forbruket har utviklet seg i OECD landene og land utenfor OECD gjennom det siste tiåret.

Slik jeg ser det nå har den globale forsyningen av råolje potensial for å vokse med 1,0 – 1,5 Mb/d gjennom 2013 drevet av responsen til en strukturelt høyere oljepris. Veksten i forsyningen er drevet av akselerasjonen i utvinningen av olje fra skifer (Bakken og Eagle Ford i USA), tilbakevending av produksjon i Libya, potensial for vekst fra Irak. Fra 2013 vil Manifa i Saudi Arabia ha potensial til å levere 0,9 Mb/d. Inkludert i forsyningsveksten vil være en normalisering av produksjonen fra Sudan der utvinningen siste året har blitt redusert med 0,4 Mb/d.

Dette skjer mens forbruket i OECD faller og det kommer motstridende oppfatninger om størrelsen på den videre økonomiske veksten for India og Kina.

VERDENS OLJEFORSYNING

Figur 1; Diagrammet ovenfor viser utviklingen i verdens forsyning av råolje og kondensat (grønne kolonner), NGL (Natural Gas Liquids; etan, propan, butan (lys blå kolonner)), annen energi i væskeform (etanol, biodiesel etc. (røde kolonner)) og volumøkninger fra raffinering (refinery gains; gule kolonner) har utviklet seg fra januar 2001 til februar 2012. I diagrammet er også tegnet inn utviklingen i oljeprisen, Brent.

Dataene fra EIA viser nå en vekst i forsyningen av råolje og kondensat og denne veksten er drevet av vekst i utvinningen av olje fra skifer, bitumen og etter hvert fra funn som krever en høy pris for å gi lønnsomhet (ref også figur 2).

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Rune Likvern

Thursday, 31 May, 2012 at 17:17

GLOBAL OLJEFORSYNING, EN OPPDATERING DESEMBER 2011

I dette innlegget vil jeg presentere hvordan den globale oljeforsyningen har utviklet seg per august 2011. Videre er verden delt opp i fire økonomiske grupper, OECD, Russland, OPEC og resten av verden (ROW; Rest Of World) for lettere å se trender.

I et senere innlegg vil jeg presentere hvordan etterspørselen/forbruket har utviklet seg i OECD landene og land utenfor OECD gjennom det siste tiåret.

For alle praktiske formål har den globale oljeforsyningen vært flat siden 2004, og dette har økt den strukturelle oljeprisen. I praksis blir nå pris også brukt til å omfordele oljeforsyningen mellom OECD og øvrige forbrukere.

Prisveksten har så langt ikke resultert i nevneverdig bedring i forsyningen og det er få ting som tyder på en bedring av forsyningen i nær fremtid.

Innenfor OPEC har bortfallet av olje fra Libya på grunn av borgerkrigen delvis blitt erstattet med økt forsyning fra Kuwait, Saudi Arabia og De Forente Arabiske Emirater (UAE).

GLOBAL FORSYNING

Figur 1; Diagrammet ovenfor viser hvordan utviklingen i den globale forsyningen av råolje og kondensat (grønne kolonner), NGL (Natural Gas Liquids; etan, propan, butan (lys blå kolonner)), annen energi i væskeform (etanol, biodiesel etc. (røde kolonner)) og volumøkninger fra raffinering (refinery gains; gule kolonner) har utviklet seg fra januar 2001 til august 2011. I diagrammet er også tegnet inn utviklingen i oljeprisen, Brent.

Fra august 2008 og til februar 2011 økte det løpende globale årlige snittet for råolje med rundt 0,45 Mb/d (millioner fat per dag). Total økning fra oljesand (bitumen) og skiferolje var i samme tidsrom rundt 1,0 Mb/d.

Med andre ord det marginale tilbudet blir nå dekt av olje som krever kostbare utvinningsteknologier mens flere gjeldstyngede land opplever en gradvis svekket evne til å betale for dette.

Det som er interessant er at oljeprisen den siste tiden har vist en noe svekket tendens. Dette kan tyde på at den totale etterspørselen nå utvikler seg svakt eller svekkes.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Rune Likvern

Wednesday, 7 December, 2011 at 00:38

Posted in OECD, OPEC, Saudi Arabia

Tagged with , , , ,

%d bloggers like this: